What’s the perfect age to rehome your puppy?

 
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We know all about the excitement of a new puppy coming to live with you in their forever home, but this transition needs to happen at a point in their development where the puppy will be able to adjust properly. Socialising young puppies before they move on to their permanent homes is at the heart of what Paws in Work are about - our events help workplace colleagues to unwind with little bundles of furry fun, but doing so is extremely valuable to the puppies’ development. We know that socialising has to be taken seriously if your puppy is to grow up to be a happy, well-adjusted dog. 

how old should your puppy be?

Puppies can go to their new homes from 8 weeks, but holding on a little longer and letting them go around 12 weeks can be really beneficial, as their development and socialising will be a lot more established by that point. Those few extra weeks can make a big difference. As we have seen with Paws in Work events, puppies can learn so much by playing and exploring on their own terms in those additional weeks that when they go to their forever homes, they’re much more prepared for their new start.


how do I prepare for a puppy?

Before your puppy gets to the right age to come and live with you as your new best friend, it’s important to be prepared. Choose a good dog bed for them, safe dog toys, a food dish, a water dish, a collar and lead, puppy food, a good brush suitable for the breed of dog, puppy shampoo a puppy toothbrush and dog toothpaste (you can get the puppy used to the idea of toothbrushing by gently cleaning their teeth with a damp finger at first). 

Do not use products like toothpaste or shampoos that are intended for humans - they’re not right for dogs at all. For example, Purina Puppy Guide states that human toothpaste could lead to uncomfortable foaming and stomach upsets for your pup, and you really don’t want that for them. 

what happens when I bring my puppy home?

As soon as you bring your new pup home for the first time, let them explore their new home while you observe. This allows them to find their way around the place and also helps you see all the places that you forgot to puppy-proof! Don’t worry - it’s easy to overlook a few places until you see puppy being curious around them. With the socialising they have had at our events, you can be sure they will be confident to explore!

how do I puppy-proof my home?

To help make your place puppy-proof, you can put up baby gates or screen doors if you want to keep certain areas off-limits. Keep any cleaning products or medication well out of reach of a curious little nose, and also make sure you don’t have any plants in the house that could be poisonous to your pup. Hide any stray electrical wires away. And as tempting as it may be, never give your puppy chocolate, as it’s toxic to dogs. You can get chocolate safe for your puppy from your local pet shop.

So, how old should your puppy be when it comes home? It should be old enough to be able to take on the changes and the challenges of a new home without being too distressed by the transition. Ten to Twelve weeks old is manageable, but a little older - can be a lot more beneficial to how your puppy develops. Remember, a puppy is for life so and although waiting those extra few weeks can be tough for you, they can be worth it to have a well-rounded pup. 

 
Ashley Fry